“I’ve seen the future, and I’m not going.”
– David McDermott

McDermott & McGough consists of visual artists David McDermott and Peter McGough. McDermott & McGough are contemporary artists known for their work in painting, photography, sculpture and film. They currently split their time between Dublin and New York City.

McDermott & McGough are best known for using alternative historical processes in their photography, including the techniques of cyanotype, gum bichromate, salt, tri color carbo, platinum and palladium. Among the subjects they approach are popular art and culture, religion, medicine, advertising, time, fashion and sexual behavior.

David McDermott was born in 1952 in Hollywood, California. He studied at Syracuse University, New York from 1970 to 1974. Peter McGough was born in 1958 in Syracuse, and studied at the same university in 1976. Their paths never crossed until they both moved to New York City some years later and started their artistic collaboration in 1980. They have since become well known for their way of blending art and daily life. Their photography involves appropriating images and objects from the late 19th century to the mid 20th century, and they project an image of themselves as gentlemen, posing as erudite, impertinent characters. In this way they have chosen to immerse themselves in the period of the Victorian era at the close of the 19th century to the style of the 1930s. During the 1980s, McDermott & McGough dressed, lived, and worked as artists and “men about town,” circa 1900-1928: they wore top hats and detachable collars, and converted a townhouse on Avenue C in New York City’s East Village, which was lit only by candlelight, to its authentic mid-19th century ideal. “We were experimenting in time,” says McDermott, “trying to build an environment and a fantasy we could live and work in.”

Like their lifestyle, their photographs and paintings betoken a flat refusal to embrace the historical present. This obsession with the past is reflected in the subjects and styles they bring back to life, and in the precise fictional dates they give to their works. The personal dimension of their work makes it into a deliberately provocative and controversial contemporary artistic performance dealing with political and sociological issues.

McDermott & McGough’s work has appeared in solo and group exhibitions at such institutions as Cheim & Read, Galerie Jérôme de Noirmont, Pat Hearn Gallery, Massimo Audiello Gallery, Galleria Gian Enzo Sperone, Sperone Westwater, Galerie Bruno Bischofberger, Frankfurter Kunstverein, Whitney Museum of American Art, New Museum of Contemporary Art, Centre Pompidou, Kunsthalle Wien, Manezh Moscow and the Irish Museum of Modern Art. Previous exhibitions also include the Whitney Biennial, New York, in 1987, 1991 and 1995. McDermott & McGough mounted a mid-career retrospective at the Provincial Museum voor Moderne Kunst, Oostende, Belgium.
David and Peter in the Studio, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY, 1980s
Photographed by Wouter Deruytter

David and Peter in Kings Palace, Naples, Italy, 1980s


David and Peter in their apartment on Avenue C, New York City, 1980s
Photographed by Jean Kallina

David and Peter in Tompkins Square Park, New York City, 1980s
Photographed by Milan Kunc

David and Peter with “The Discoverers of Deaging and Life Everlasting, 1886” at Pat Hearn Gallery, New York City
Photographed by Josef Astor
1986
David and Peter in Naples, Italy, 1980s


David and Peter in Tompkins Square Park, New York City, 1980s
Photographed by Milan Kunc

David and Peter at Villa Fersen, Capri, Italy, 1980s


David and Peter at the Lake of Constance, Bregenze, Austria
Photographed by Wouter Deruytter
1993
David McDermott, by Andy Warhol, 1980s


David in Brooklyn, NY, Williamsburg Bridge, 1980s


“On the Street,” by Amy Arbus, 1980s


David and Peter in their apartment on Avenue C, New York City, 1980s


Peter in the Studio, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY, 1990s
Photographed by Wouter Deruytter

Peter McGough, by Andy Warhol, 1980s


David and Peter with “A Friend of Dorothy, 1943” at the 1987 Whitney Biennial